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CSA Resources in South Florida & Austin

Nothing is more nourishing for you body, soul and tastebuds than organic veggies right out of the earth. It is a game changer for flavor and nutritional value.¬†The average ingredient in a grocery store travels 1500 miles to get to you shopping cart and then onto your plate.¬†In order to transport food long distances, much of it is picked while still unripe and then gassed to ‚Äúripen‚ÄĚ it after transport, or it is highly processed in factories using preservatives, irradiation, and other means to keep it stable for transport and sale. This greatly diminishes the nutrient value (that is already lowered by modern factory farming practices). By supporting a local CSA you are doing good for you body, the environment and the community, not to mention saving money!

CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture and essentially means that you help inject funds into the farm (typically in one lump sum) to assist in their seasonal operation by purchasing a weekly “share”- AKA a box of amazingly fresh produce only days if not hours old.

The nice thing about a CSA is that it is typically cheaper than the grocery store organics and sometimes the farmers market as they choose what to send you (based on what is growing in abundance). They also typically deliver to a drop-point near you so that you don’t have to trek to the market. Local farmers markets are also a great option but get to know your farmers as they are not always selling local and organic or non-sprayed produce- ask questions!

If you are not in South Florida or Austin visit Local Harvest for a CSA or farmers market near you. If we missed someone important on this list please let us know!

CSA Programs in South Florida

Bee Heaven Farm
Grower Margie Pickarski offers a weekly or biweekly FAMILY share, which usually satisfies the produce needs for a plant-centric family of 2-4. For individuals or small families, the farm offers a weekly or biweekly SMALL share, which is sufficient for 1-3 people. Additional items may be purchased from a webstore, to accompany your share on your delivery day. Learn More

Harpke Family Farm
Tamer and Claire Harpke (follow their travels in Egypt this summer on social media)¬†offer weekly LARGE shares at their Urban Farm in Dania Beach which usually meet the produce needs for a family of 2-4. Individuals or smaller families who don‚Äôt consume lots of produce, a weekly SMALL share is available. Check out their super interesting microgreen CSA & Flexible Carrot Program too!¬†Learn More read more…

Spicy Cauliflower Ceviche with Coconut Milk & Peanuts

It’s rare to find someone who doesn’t like ceviche, but if you are trying to eat less animals, finding a good ceviche can be a challenge. Enter-¬†Spicy Cauliflower Ceviche with Coconut Milk & Peanuts!¬†This recipe is honestly to die for, and you can add all sorts or additions or exchanges to make it your own.

Once you have the cauliflower method down you are off and runnin’. I served it with some Rhythm Superfoods Beet Chips, both on the side and crumbled on top for an interesting and sweet crunch. You can also serve with tortilla or plantain chips for dipping. It’s plant-based (aka vegan), paleo, dairy-free and dee-lish!

Spicy Cauliflower Ceviche with Coconut Milk & Peanuts

3/4 lb cauliflower, cored and cut into baseball size chunks (about 1/2 medium head)
2 medium garlic cloves, finely chopped
3/4 teaspoon Himalayan salt
Zest of 1 lime read more…

A DIY Compost for FREE (or almost)!

I published this post on May 15th, 2013. Five years later it is still relevant and the exact procedure I use to this day. Have a read and inspire yourself to end the days of adding unnecessarily to the endless waste we produce as humans and turning that waste into something useful with very little effort!

Composting has become quite popular- en vogue if you will, kinda like having the urban chicken coop. Some folks I know have been doing it for as long as I can remember, hardly trendy- just plain smart, eco-friendly and easy. My parents (both sets of them) have fabulous composting systems that feed their prolific gardens year after year. Many of my friends now also have their own systems, some of which are simply acting as decomposition for natural waste (rather than sending it to a landfill), not necessarily for going back into food production. read more…

Zucchini Pasta & Kelp Noodles with Sunflower Cilantro Pesto

Kelp noodles are one of my favorite ingredients these days and this Zucchini Pasta & Kelp Noodles with Sunflower Cilantro Pesto dish is a happy new addition to my growing repertoire of both kelp and zucchini noodle recipes..

I LOVE to eat and I don’t count calories. Yet there is no denying that¬†too many of them can be unkind. Enter kelp noodles! Now the words “kelp noodles” do not conjure up visions of an unctuous and mouthwatering morsel….however they have no flavor and are basically a vehicle for amazing sauces.

The only trick however is that while they do not need to be cooked, they do need to be soaked in warm filtered water and baking soda for at least 20 minutes to let them soften. This is not something that you will find instructed on the packaging…it seems to be underground intel that I am happy to have, and happy to share! So whether you are ambitious to make the recipe below or you just want to throw some store-bought pesto or peanut sauce on these puppies you will not be disappointed, I promise!

Kelp Zucchini Noodles

read more…

How to Sprout Most Beans

Sprouts are fun and easy to grow and are delicious, alkaline and packed full of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. These fun little projects are also a great source of vitamins E, C, B and A as well as potassium, magnesium, iron, calcium and protein. Sprouting unlocks the nutrients & protein inside the plant cells more readily and makes the protein found beans as well as nuts & seeds more bioavailable and more digestible. Sprouting as well as soaking, or fermenting foods also significantly reduces enzyme inhibitors, greatly increasing the digestibility and absorption of all nutrients in food, including amino acids.

For a more in-depth look at why sprouting is so awesome, check out my guy Dr. Josef Mercola’s article.¬†

FullSizeRenderStep #1 Select Your Bean & Quantity:
Use organic beans such as adzuki, lentils, mung beans or chickpeas.¬†The beans beans will at least double in size during sprouting, so only prepare as many sprouts as you can eat in about 4 weeks. The fastest to sprout are mung beans and lentils, especially if you live in a humid climate. My favorite beans are adzuki beans (shown here) for their nutty texture, high protein and iron and anti-oxidant content. Most dry beans are good for sprouting but you want to avoid black beans as they can be toxic.¬†Note that “split” beans or peas will not sprout.

Step #2- Soak Your Beans:
Place your beans in a wide-mouthed glass jar and fill with filtered water until the beans are covered by about 4 inches of water (use this rule for any amount for beans). Allow them to soak in the water overnight, or for about 8 to 12 hours and then rinse and drain them very well as they can go off if they are too moist. I do this several times inside the jar. Cover with a piece screen from the hardware store (shown here) or a piece of cheesecloth. Leave the jar in a semi-lit place while the beans sprout (I like my kitchen near the window). read more…

How I Changed My Diet and Why

Many of you might have the notion that I am uber healthy, a model for wellness, that I have “it down” and rarely stray from the perfect eating and exercise routine. Not so. Read on to see How I Changed My Diet & Why…

While I do eat “well” compared to much of America- I do not necessarily always walk the talk.hacienda-photo14

“Let food by thy medicine and medicine be thy food”. YES! But what does this mean?

I am healthy. I almost never get sick, I don’t go to the doctor, I eat my veggies, practice yoga, go to the gym, spend time outdoors. Then why do I feel like crap a lot of the time? Low energy, constant body aches, mood swings, a back that hurts almost constantly, weight fluctuations.

It’s in the food. Well and the in the wine perhaps.

How do I know this you ask? Because promptly returning from a three week holiday trip filled with essentially whatever I felt like I wanted to consume- my husband Anthony and I went vegan, kicked the gluten, sugar, dairy and booze (don’t worry, I still have my coffee!). read more…

Herbed Farinata with Roasted Garlic & Tomatoes- Easy Gluten-Free ‚ÄúPizza‚ÄĚ

I went to Italy a few years ago with a group from Slow Food Miami to the Terra Madre global food gathering…to say it was breathtaking, fantastic and delicious would be a huge understatement. If you are interested in food, sustainability and a global community that impact change through food- I highly recommend it!

I also recommend trying this Herbed Farinata with Roasted Garlic & Tomatoes- my adaptation to an incredible dish that I discovered while on this trip. Farinata is a Tuscan street food made with garbanzo or chickpea flour and topped with pizza-like toppings. You make a thin crepe type batter and pour into a hot pan and then add your favorite toppings. It makes a quick, protein-rich meal that is delish and super fast. You can keep it simple or add any toppings you want, and of course it is gluten-free and vegan if you choose.

read more…